Feb 17

“That pizza really hit the spot!” 「ごちそうさま!ピザがちょうど食べたかったんだ!」

何かを食べた時、ちょうどそれが食べたかったからとても満足だと感じたら、「hit the spot」というフレーズを使えます。スポットに当たるとは完全に合っている、ちょうど必要なものであるという意味ですが、ほとんどの場合、食べ物・飲み物に使う表現です。

If you eat something, and it is very satisfying because it was exactly what you wanted to eat, you can say that it “hit the spot”. To hit the spot is to be exactly right, or exactly what was needed, but this phrase is most often used with food or drinks.

Tagged with:
Feb 03

“My cousin used to bring his video games and we would play until the cows came home.” 「従妹がゲーム機を持ってきて、いつも遅くまでゲームをしていた。」

ずっと何かをして、終わりそうにない、遅くまでそれをしたら「牛たちが帰ってくるまで」と言います。もちろん、牛は普段日帰り旅行とかには行きませんが、牛たちはよく町に出かけて夜遅くまで帰ってこないと想像してください。

If you do something for a long time, with no end in sight, you do it “until the cows come home”. Of course, cows usually don’t go on day trips into the city. But imagine that the cows go to town and don’t come back until late at night.

Tagged with:
Jan 20

“I’m sorry. I’d like to help you, but my hands are tied.” 「申し訳ない。助けてやりたいが、どうにもできないんだ。」

ルールに反するからしたいことができないときに、「Our hands are tied」と言います。例えば、生徒たちが自分で書いた劇をやりたいと言い出すとします。しかしこの学校は「ロミオとジュリエット」などシェイクスピアの劇しか演劇しないというポリシーがあります。先生は例外にしていただけるか尋ねますが、学校側からダメと言われます。先生は「オリジナルな劇をやらせてあげたいけれどどうにもできないんだ」と生徒たちに言います。

We often say that our hands are tied when we can’t do something because it would break the rules. For example, imagine some students want to write an original play for their school play. But the school has a policy that they only do Shakespeare plays, like Romeo and Juliette. The teacher asks if they can make an exception but is told no. The teacher tells the students he would love to do an original play, but his hands are tied.

Tagged with:
Jan 06

“I know I lied to you in the past, but I’ve turned over a new leaf. You can believe me this time.” 「前に嘘をついたことを承知していますが、私はもう変わりました。今回は信じて大丈夫です。」

年明けにはこれからは今までと違うようにする、自分を変えると決める人が多くいます。自分の生き方を大きく変えたら「turned over a new leaf」というフレーズ江表現できます。このフレーズのleafは葉っぱではなく本のページです。自分の人生という本を書いていると想像してください。前のチャプターと違う新しいチャプターを始めるときはページをめくって新しい真っ白のページに向かいます。

At the beginning of the year, many people decide to make a change, and do things differently from now on. If you make a big change in your behavior, we say you’ve “turned over a new leaf.” The leaf in this phrase is not a leaf from a tree, but a page in a book. Imagine you are writing a book that is your life. When you start a new chapter, different from the chapter before, you turn to a new, blank page.

Tagged with:
Dec 09

“This project is going down to the wire.” 「このプロジェクトはぎりぎりになりそう。」

“This year’s election really went down to the wire.” 「今年の当選は最後まで結果わからなかったね。」

Wire(針金)は競馬でフィニッシュラインに張ります。どの馬が一番にゴールしたか判断するのに使います。とてもきわどい競争ではワイヤーに到達するまで結果がわかりません。このイディオムは、「ぎりぎりまで結果がわからない」ことを表現したい時に使えます。(プロジェクトは時間内にできるか、選挙で誰が勝つかなど)。

A wire is stretched across the finish line in a horse race. It’s used to measure which horse crossed the finish line first. In a very close race, we don’t know the result until the horses reach the wire. We can use this idiom to describe something when we won’t know the outcome (Will the project be a success? Who will win the election?) until the very last second.

Tagged with:
Nov 25

“Of course, I couldn’t speak fluently right off the bat. It took a lot of study.” 「もちろん、最初めから流暢に喋られたわけではありません。たくさん勉強したからです。」

Off the batとは「すぐに」「最初から」の意味です。ベースボールやクリケット、選手がバットでボールを打つゲームを想像してみて下さい。他のプレイヤーはボールをキャッチするために走ったり、次のベースに向かったり、すぐに反応しないといけません。ボールがどの方向に飛んでいくかがわからないので、バットにボールがあたるまでは反応できません(それもボールを打つのに成功すればの話です)。ボールが飛んでいく瞬間がすべての始まりです。

“Off the bat” means “immediately” or “at the very beginning”. Think of baseball or cricket, sports where a player hits a ball with a bat. The other players must react quickly, running to catch the ball or get to the next base. They can’t react before the bat hits the ball, because they don’t know which direction it will go (if the player even hits the ball). The instant when the ball goes flying is the start of the action.

Tagged with:
Nov 11

“Into every life, a little rain must fall.” 「どの人生でも多少雨が降らないといけません。」

「Into every life some rain must fall」は1800年代にアメリカ人の詩人ヘンリー・ワーズワース・ロングフェローによって書かれた詩の一節です。この有名な言葉は、誰にでも悪いことが起こるという意味でよく使われています。誰だってHappy続きの人生は送れません。もちろん、雨よりお天気が多い方を願いますけどね。

“Into every life some rain must fall” is a famous line written by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, an American poet, in the 1800s. The phrase has become well-known and is used to say that bad things happen to everyone sometimes; nobody’s life is all happiness. Of course, we hope to have more sunshine than rain.

Tagged with:
Oct 28

“A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.” 「手中にある一羽は芝生にいる二羽の鳥と同じ価値。」

野鳥を捕まえることは難しいです。一羽でも捕まえたなら上出来です。まだ芝生にたくさんの鳥がいて、すべてを捕まえることは不可能かもしれません。同時にあと二羽を捕まえようとすると、手の中にいる一羽を逃がしてしまうかもしれません。「a bird in the hand」というフレーズで、高く望みすぎて既にできたことを台無しにしないようにという忠告です。

It’s hard to catch a wild bird. If you’ve already caught one bird, you’ve done a pretty good job. There are many more birds out there, but it might not be possible to catch them all. If you try to catch two more birds at once, you might let the bird you have caught escape. We say “a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush” to warn against being too ambitious and undoing the progress you’ve made.

Tagged with:
Oct 14

“They had a lot to catch up on. They were talking up a storm all evening.” 「久しぶりに会って、ディナーの時間中ずっとしゃべり通していた。」

“I think she’s really sick. She was coughing up a storm.” 「彼女は重い病気だと思う。いっぱい咳をしていた。」

“I thought he would be shy, but he danced up a storm at the party.” 「彼はシャイだと思ったけどパーティーでは踊りまくっていた。」

動詞の後にup a stormをつけると、「何かをたくさんした」「勢いよくした」と表現することができます。

You can add “up a storm” after different verbs to say someone did something a lot, or with great enthusiasm.

Tagged with:
Oct 01

“Why didn’t you call the restaurant ahead of time?” 「なんで前もってレストランに電話しなかったの?」

“It’s not my fault. John was supposed to do it.” 「私のせいじゃないよ。ジョンがやるべきだった。」

“You’re just passing the buck!” 「責任から逃れようとしないで!」

「Passing the buck」とは責任や責められることを他人に転嫁して自分が逃れるという意味です。アメリカのトルーマン大統領の有名な台詞「The buck stops here」は「それをしない」という意味でした。大統領として決断してその責任をとると言っていました。Buckという言葉には色々な意味がありますが、この場合は(トランプで遊ぶ)ポーカーが由来です!

“Passing the buck” means transferring blame or responsibility to someone else. American president Truman famously said, “The buck stops here,” to mean he would not pass the buck to anyone else; he would make decisions as president and take responsibility for them. The word “buck” has many meanings, but this phrase originally came from the game of poker!

Tagged with:
preload preload preload
Follow

Get every new post on this blog delivered to your Inbox.

Join other followers: